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European Tensions | War | Mobilization | Poland - France | Battle of Britain | Dieppe | Battle of the North Atlantic | Training the Empire | The Pacific | Quebec Conference | Hong Kong | Home Front | Italy | Conscription | Normandy | France | Netherlands | Germany

By the spring of 1944 the war had shifted drastically in the allies favour and the second front in France seemed to be on the brink of reality. Germany was retreating on most fronts the home front was waiting for word that the sacrifice of Dieppe had not been in vain and that those lessons would be well used for the invasion of Nazi occupied France.

England had become a floating arsenal of millions of English, American and Canadian troops just waiting for the word to go. The Germans expected the attempted invasion and were quickly building up the Atlantic Wall and re-enforcing the troops stationed on the shores of France.

Finally on June 6th, 1944 word came that the invasion had begun, the destination was Normandy and the troops had landed. Whether the invasion would be successful of not would take a few days to determine but they had made it ashore.

Canada played a vital role in the invasion with forces landing on Juno beach. The resistance varied but Canadian troops moved quickly to secure their objectives and start to move inland. By the end of the first day, they had made more progress then any of the other beachheads and looked well positioned to keep going.

 

Globe and Mail staff on D-Day

Although the fighting was fierce the fact that the foothold in France had been established and was expanding lent a confidence to Canada and the allies. as Churchill would have said - it was the beginning of the end for Germany.

 

Canadians land on Juno Beach




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Reference: www.canadahistory.com/sections/eras/eras.html