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The Canadians landed on Juno Beach on June 6th, 1944 and although the day saw some heavy fighting, this was to be just the beginning of a tough campaign. Their initial objective was the French city off Caen but German counterattacks with some of their best Panzer units made every step costly.

The capture of Caen came slowly but the next real target was Falaise. By holding down much of the German force that was reinforcing the Normandy theatre, the Canadians had allowed the Americans an opportunity to breakout in the west towards Cherbourg and then south and so that hey could awing around behind the German lines and then turn North to meet the Canadians and British at Falaise.

The Canadian attacks towards Falaise were through rough hedge growth countryside which was ideal for defence and Canadian attacks used the tanks as support for the infantry rather then the razor sharp knife for cutting deep into German lines and speeding through to Falaise. Eventually the gap was closed and tens of thousands German troops were captured in the Falaise pocket in July.

This blew open the front for allied armies to advance all along the front and on August 25th Paris was liberated. The Canadian troops moved along the coast of France, liberating towns, cities and citizens as they went. The Germans were in full retreat and the advance was lighting fast. At home in Canada the talk turned to the war in European being over by Christmas. By the fall France was liberated and the allies moved into the low countries.




Source:
Reference: www.canadahistory.com/sections/eras/eras.html