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Prehistory | 2 Worlds Meet | New France | England Arrives | Clash of Empires | Revolution | British America | Reform/Revolt | Responsible Government | Confederation | Nation Building | Laurier | The Great War | Roaring 20's | Great Depression | WWII | The Peace | Cold War | Trudeau | PC's in Power | Modern Canada

A New France | The Iroquois  | English Invasion | Peace | Seigneiurial System | The Kings Girls | Canadian Identity | Society | Government | The Church | Champlain | Frontenac | Acadia | The Fall

The church took a central role of life and activities in the colony of New France. Along with the settlers that first began arriving in Canada, the France authorities began to send out members of a Roman Catholic religious order know as the Jesuits. The Jesuits were established by the Pope in response to the reformation in Europe and were considered to be the shock troops of the counter-reformation. Their objectives were to bring those Christians who had strayed away from the Catholic Church back into the fold and to convert all heathen savages who worshipped pagan gods or were not Roman Catholics into the fold.

In New France this took the form of intense missionary work among the native peoples in general and the Huron's in particular. The Jesuits would venture into native territory and join and then live with the various bands in order to establish a relationship with them and then convert them to Cat holism. This staunch Catholic activity formed a strong presence in the settlements and cities of New France and he church established itself as the third pillar or society after the governmental and military authorities. After the defeat of the French armies in 1759-60, the church remained the only one of the pillars still standing and became the refuge of French Canadian culture and society for the next two hundred years.




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Reference: www.canadahistory.com/sections/eras/eras.html